Stata FAQ
How can I graph the results of the margins command? (Stata 12)

Graphing results from the margins command can help in the interpretation of your model. Stata 12 introduced the marginsplot command which make the graphing process very easy.

Let's start off with an easy example.

Example 1

The first example is a 3x2 factorial analysis of covariance. We will run the model using anova but we would get the same results if we ran it using regression.
use http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/data/hsbdemo, clear

anova write prog##female math read

                           Number of obs =     200     R-squared     =  0.6932
                           Root MSE      = 6.59748     Adj R-squared =  0.5155

                  Source |  Partial SS    df       MS           F     Prob > F
             ------------+----------------------------------------------------
                   Model |   12394.507    73  169.787767       3.90     0.0000
                         |
                    prog |  22.3772184     2  11.1886092       0.26     0.7737
                  female |  1125.44586     1  1125.44586      25.86     0.0000
             prog#female |   287.95987     2  143.979935       3.31     0.0398
                    math |  2449.19165    39   62.799786       1.44     0.0670
                    read |  2015.49976    29  69.4999916       1.60     0.0411
                         |
                Residual |  5484.36799   126  43.5267301   
             ------------+----------------------------------------------------
                   Total |   17878.875   199   89.843593 
Next, we run the margins command to get the six adjust cell means from the 3x2 interaction. These adjusted cells means are called least squares means (lsmeans) in SAS or estimated marginal means (emmeans) in SPSS.
margins prog#female, asbalanced

Adjusted predictions                              Number of obs   =        200

Expression   : Linear prediction, predict()
at           : prog             (asbalanced)
               female           (asbalanced)
               math             (asbalanced)
               read             (asbalanced)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             |            Delta-method
             |     Margin   Std. Err.      z    P>|z|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
 prog#female |
        1 0  |   50.43791   1.969439    25.61   0.000     46.57788    54.29794
        1 1  |    56.9152   1.948113    29.22   0.000     53.09697    60.73343
        2 0  |   52.58387   1.408514    37.33   0.000     49.82323    55.34451
        2 1  |   55.05205    1.41875    38.80   0.000     52.27136    57.83275
        3 0  |   47.81982   2.108078    22.68   0.000     43.68806    51.95158
        3 1  |   57.29057   1.785628    32.08   0.000     53.79081    60.79034
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The marginsplot is used after margins to plot the adjusted cell means.
/* plot prog by female */
marginsplot, noci

We can also graph the results for female by prog just by using the x() option.
/* plot female by prog */      
marginsplot, x(female) noci
             

Example 2

For our second example we will graph the results of a categorical by continuous interaction from a logistic regression model.
use http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/data/logitcatcon, clear

logit y i.f##c.s, nolog

Logistic regression                               Number of obs   =        200
                                                  LR chi2(3)      =      71.01
                                                  Prob > chi2     =     0.0000
Log likelihood =  -96.28586                       Pseudo R2       =     0.2694

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
           y |      Coef.   Std. Err.      z    P>|z|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
         1.f |   5.786811   2.302518     2.51   0.012     1.273959    10.29966
           s |   .1773383   .0364362     4.87   0.000     .1059248    .2487519
             |
       f#c.s |
          1  |  -.0895522   .0439158    -2.04   0.041    -.1756255   -.0034789
             |
       _cons |  -9.253801    1.94189    -4.77   0.000    -13.05983   -5.447767
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
We will use the margins command to get the predicted probabilities for 11 values of s from 20 to 70 for both f equal zero and f equal one. The vsquish option just reduces the number of blank lines in the output.
margins f, at(s=(20(5)70)) vsquish

Adjusted predictions                              Number of obs   =        200
Model VCE    : OIM

Expression   : Pr(y), predict()
1._at        : s               =          20
2._at        : s               =          25
3._at        : s               =          30
4._at        : s               =          35
5._at        : s               =          40
6._at        : s               =          45
7._at        : s               =          50
8._at        : s               =          55
9._at        : s               =          60
10._at       : s               =          65
11._at       : s               =          70

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             |            Delta-method
             |     Margin   Std. Err.      z    P>|z|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
       _at#f |
        1 0  |   .0033115   .0040428     0.82   0.413    -.0046123    .0112353
        1 1  |   .1529993    .098668     1.55   0.121    -.0403864    .3463851
        2 0  |   .0079995   .0083179     0.96   0.336    -.0083033    .0243023
        2 1  |   .2188574   .1104097     1.98   0.047     .0024583    .4352564
        3 0  |   .0191964   .0164503     1.17   0.243    -.0130456    .0514383
        3 1  |   .3029251   .1126363     2.69   0.007      .082162    .5236882
        4 0  |   .0453489   .0304422     1.49   0.136    -.0143166    .1050145
        4 1  |   .4026401   .1026147     3.92   0.000      .201519    .6037612
        5 0  |   .1033756   .0500784     2.06   0.039     .0052238    .2015275
        5 1  |   .5111116   .0827069     6.18   0.000      .349009    .6732142
        6 0  |   .2186457   .0674192     3.24   0.001     .0865065    .3507849
        6 1  |   .6185467   .0611384    10.12   0.000     .4987176    .7383758
        7 0  |   .4044675   .0706157     5.73   0.000     .2660634    .5428717
        7 1  |   .7155135   .0476424    15.02   0.000     .6221361    .8088909
        8 0  |    .622414   .0675171     9.22   0.000     .4900828    .7547452
        8 1  |    .795962   .0437198    18.21   0.000     .7102727    .8816513
        9 0  |   .8000327   .0610245    13.11   0.000     .6804269    .9196385
        9 1  |   .8581703   .0421992    20.34   0.000     .7754613    .9408793
       10 0  |   .9066322   .0443791    20.43   0.000     .8196508    .9936136
       10 1  |   .9037067   .0387213    23.34   0.000     .8278143    .9795991
       11 0  |   .9592963   .0267857    35.81   0.000     .9067973    1.011795
       11 1  |   .9357181   .0332641    28.13   0.000     .8705218    1.000914
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
In total, there are 22 values in the above table. There are two predicted probabilities for each value of s. One each for males and females.

Now we can go ahead and graph the probabilities using the marginsplot command. This time we will include the default confidence intervals.

marginsplot

We can make the graph more visually attractive by shading the area inside the confidence intervals.
marginsplot, recast(line) recastci(rarea)

The graph of the probabilities above is nice as far as it goes but the presentation of the results might be clearer if we were to graph the difference in probabilities between males and females. To do this we will need to rerun the margins command computing the discrete change for f at each value of read. We can get the difference using the dydx (derivative) option.
margins, dydx(f) at(s=(20(5)70)) vsquish

Conditional marginal effects                      Number of obs   =        200
Model VCE    : OIM

Expression   : Pr(y), predict()
dy/dx w.r.t. : 1.f
1._at        : s               =          20
2._at        : s               =          25
3._at        : s               =          30
4._at        : s               =          35
5._at        : s               =          40
6._at        : s               =          45
7._at        : s               =          50
8._at        : s               =          55
9._at        : s               =          60
10._at       : s               =          65
11._at       : s               =          70

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
             |            Delta-method
             |      dy/dx   Std. Err.      z    P>|z|     [95% Conf. Interval]
-------------+----------------------------------------------------------------
1.f          |
         _at |
          1  |   .1496878   .0987508     1.52   0.130    -.0438602    .3432358
          2  |   .2108578   .1107226     1.90   0.057    -.0061545    .4278701
          3  |   .2837288   .1138312     2.49   0.013     .0606236    .5068339
          4  |   .3572912    .107035     3.34   0.001     .1475064     .567076
          5  |    .407736   .0966865     4.22   0.000     .2182339     .597238
          6  |    .399901   .0910124     4.39   0.000       .22152     .578282
          7  |    .311046   .0851843     3.65   0.000     .1440878    .4780042
          8  |    .173548   .0804362     2.16   0.031     .0158959    .3312001
          9  |   .0581376   .0741941     0.78   0.433    -.0872801    .2035553
         10  |  -.0029255   .0588969    -0.05   0.960    -.1183612    .1125102
         11  |  -.0235782    .042708    -0.55   0.581    -.1072843    .0601279
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note: dy/dx for factor levels is the discrete change from the base level.
Everything is ready for the marginsplot command.
marginsplot, yline(0)
 
 
As nice as the above graph is, it might look better done as a range plot with area shading between the upper and lower confidence bounds.
marginsplot, recast(line) recastci(rarea) yline(0)
             
If you want the lines in these graphs to be smoother, just include more values in the at option, say (20(2)70) instead of (20(5)70).

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